About

Roma Anderson is a Bachelor of Fine Arts Honours student at the Elam School of Fine Art in Auckland, New Zealand.

Roma Anderson is a Bachelor of Fine Arts Honours student at the Elam School of Fine Art in Auckland, New Zealand. She is a Pakeha artist originating from and residing in New Zealand, and was born and raised in Auckland.

Roma is an avid contemporary analogue and digital alternative method artist, who never does things quite in the way they are conventionally done. She is a collector of antique analogue cameras and equipment, and embraces the unpredictability of film as a medium, especially its ability to capture the spiritual resonance of a place, object, or person. She aims to act as a conduit for the agency of environments and deconstruct how they are framed and valued, both aesthetically and politically. Inhabiting the liminal spaces between divisions and oppositions, working to generate, by processing analogically and digitally, abstract and confronting works to protest the marginalization of the waterways.

Currently, Roma is documenting the Tamaki estuary, along which she grew up and has resided by at several different points along the waterway. She aims to provide a space where the river can have a voice and be heard as an equal. Creating both striking imagery that writhes across the screen and cannot be ignored, and softer documentations that allow a glimpse into the complexity and beauty of the space.

Roma is also a photogram practitioner, exploring the politics of female representation in cinema, and the roles of spectator, voyeur, auteur and character in film. She is interested in the moments between the frames of a film, and their spiritual substance; using alternative methods to capture the soul of a film and discern what it is that strikes us emotionally. Her photograms also explore the relationship between the positive and negative of a film, providing extremely abstract and high-contrast images that deny the viewer context and references, confronting them with the truth, the body and soul of the moving-image.

-Alicia Taylor